Denial is not a solution: Something you owe your customers and your employees

September 4, 2018
 
 
Denial is not a solution: Something you owe your customers and your employees
 
Why do so many people procrastinate about making a will? Why is it so hard to get young people to buy health insurance? Because it is one of those “probably won’t happen–at least in the foreseeable future, and I‘ve got more interesting things to worry about or spend my money on” issues.
 
Small business owners tend to take the same approach to making business continuity plans in case of a disaster. They are usually fully consumed just running the business and keeping revenues steady and growing. Diverting energies and resources to a “what if” scenario just isn’t an imperative.
 
There are affordable, effective tools out there that will allow any smaller firm to develop effective business continuity plans, but they only work if you take action. Our best advice to overcome denial? Think of this scenario: If something happened right now and your entire operation came to a halt because of a cyber attack, a power failure, data loss, or a single point of failure hardware event, what would you do? Do you even know who you would call in for help?
 
It can be a scary thought, but one that merits your attention. Talk to a managed service provider about a proposal to develop a complete business continuity plan. You owe it to yourself and to all the employees who rely on your for their livelihood.